Explanation of Advanced Stats

List and explanation of the most talked about advanced stats I reference on this blog:

Corsi On-Ice:
Corsi measures the offense a team generates while a certain player is on the ice. It is the sum of the goals, shots on net, missed shots, and blocked shots. The goals, shots on net, missed shots, and blocked shots of the opposition is then subtracted from this sum to give you your On-Ice Corsi. It is one of the most looked at advanced stats.

Corsi Rel./Fenwick:
Relative Corsi, also known as Fenwick, is the same as On-Ice Corsi except it excludes blocked shots.

Corsi QoC:
This Corsi number takes into consideration the quality of competition. For instance, third and fourth lines typically have lower Corsi numbers because they usually face the top lines of the opponent. Corsi QoC accounts for this. Typically third and fourth liners have good Corsi QoC values while top line players struggle in this category.

Corsi Rel. QoC:
This is the same as Corsi QoC only it does not include blocked shots. It is the Fenwick when competition levels are considered.

PDO:
PDO is the sum of the on-ice save percentage and (ten times) the on-ice shooting percentage. A PDO of 1000 is considered the baseline.

Offensive Zone Start/Finish Percentage:
This stat is just what it sounds like. It’s the percentage of shifts a player starts in the offensive zone and the percentage of shifts a player ends in the offensive zone. I usually look at the differential of the two. Obviously you want to end more shifts in the offensive zone than you begin there. Typically third and fourth liners have positive differentials while top line players have negative values. This is because top lines start such a high percentage of shifts in the offensive zone that it is nearly impossible to have a positive differential. Likewise, bottom lines typically start less than 50% of shifts in the offensive zone, leaving them lots of room to have a positive differential. This stat is great for comparing players with similar roles, but don’t rely on it to compare a first and third liner.

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